1. He brutally keeps after Candy, and Candy's reaction can be seen in the adverbs Steinbeck uses to describe how Candy looks: "uneasily," "hopefully," "hopelessly." The first reason Carlson gives for shooting Candy's dog is its old age. Reluctantly, Candy gives in. He also notes that the animal is old and crippled. The event with Candy's dog is Carlson's major contribution to the plot of the story. It symbolizes two things. He goads Candy to shoot the dog, which Candy refuses to do. As the men marvel over it, Carlson offers to kill the dog quickly by shooting it in the back of the head. Got no teeth, damn near blind, can't eat. Get him outa here, Candy! Similarly Candy's dog is a very carefully crafted character. Carlson may be the least interesting important character. Candy reluctantly concedes and stays in his bunk while Carlson takes the dog outside and shoots it. The short letter praises the magazine. Answered by Fuad K #798805 on 5/31/2018 2:20 PM According to Candy, his dog … Carlson's Connections to Other Characters. I don’t know nothing that stinks as bad as an old dog. When Candy refuses to shoot his old dog, Slim gives Carlson permission to put it out of its misery. I can smell that dog a mile away. You gotta get him out." The dog of Candy, the elderly, disabled swamper on the ranch in Soledad, is a parallel to Candy himself as well as to the relationship between George and Lennie.After losing his hand in an accident several years ago, Candy has been allowed to stay on, but is relegating to doing odd jobs devoid of physical labor. Candy feeds him milk. Carlson offers to shoot the old dog, complaining many times of the smell. Carlson then offers to shoot the dog …

Get an answer to your question "What are carlson's reasons for shooting candy's dog? The fist being Lennie's death in the end of the book and secondly the life or status of Candy. The shooting of Candy's dog shows the callousness of Carlson and the reality of old age and infirmity. Carlson takes the dog outside, promising Slim that he will bury the corpse. Carlson initially petitions Slim about killing Candy's old dog. Carlson wants to shoot the dog because the dog smells and it is old. Carlson wanted to shoot Candy's dog because is was smelly, but mainly because it was old, toothless and overall in a miserable physical state, and Carlson wanted to put it out of it's misery. We learn about all we need to know from when he tells Slim, "Whyn't you get Candy to shoot his old dog and give him one of the pups to raise up? The dog is symbolic for anything that has outlived its usefullness. ..." in English if there is no answer or all answers are wrong, use a search bar and … "Well, I can’t stand him in here," said Carlson. Carlson begins complaining again about the smell of Candy's old dog. "That stink hangs around even after he’s gone." Candy felt he should have been with his dog in the last moments of its life. He can't chew nothing else" (2.193). "God awmighty, that dog stinks. Carlson suggests shooting Candy's dog because he stinks. The dog is barely alive and has no teeth.

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